Why does it take so long?

 

5,5 months PO

Recently I got asked over and over again “why is your recovery taking so long?” Well, here it is….

The hip is not “just” a broken bone. The femoral neck is one of  THE  major weight bearing bones in the entire body and neither the fracture nor the recovery is a joke. It is considered a life threatening injury to have and can have many devastating complications, not just during surgery but also in the recovery.

My recovery is slow yes, but everything is going smooth and according to plan. What more could I wish for??

 

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People who ask “how much longer is this going to take?/ Is this ever going to end?/ Geez, this is going on forever!/ Why are you still in physical therapy?” and other charming questions don’t realize just how serious of an injury this is and how incredibly complex the recovery is.

Recovering from hip pinning is way harder than recovering from a  THR. Only young, healthy and active people will be given this kind of surgery, because it’s too tough for older people and they have a higher risks of complications, such as AVN.

~~~

I started off with “toe touching only” for six weeks, to really give the fractured bone a rest and was full time on crutches for 14 weeks, weaning off for another six weeks. So basically I spent the whole month of January, February, March and April on crutches and did not get far.

The recovery is very very delicate since you can not put “too much weight – too soon” on the hip, otherwise it re-breaks and then “the shit has hit the fan”, to be very blunt.

 

Everything has to be learnt all over again over the course of many months and hundreds of hours of physical therapy.

Simple things like “standing” on two legs for example, with the weight equally spread out, is not easy at the beginning and one has to learn to stand for “longer periods” of time, 5 minutes, 10 minutes ect. again.

Might not seem important but it is. How many times a day does one “just” stand? Brushing your teeth, putting make up on, cooking, prepping meals, ironing, standing in line  somewhere…, leave alone learning how to stand on “one” leg again.

 

Other tasks I can think of that everybody takes for granted but I had to learn again:

  • getting up from a chair/ low seated couch
  • unassisted showering
  • putting on socks & shoes by myself
  • getting in and out of a car
  • eventually drive myself again, whereas my op leg is the right
  • doing stairs
  • shifting weight forward and sideways
  • walking without crutches and walking altogether

 

The hip is a very complex joint and lays super deep within the body. It is surrounded by 17 muscles and being on crutches for such a long time will do a serious number on them.

Atrophy begins after 11 days not using muscles, imagine what the muscles look like after 140 days on crutches! Not much left.

 

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Muscle mass is disappearing very fast and it takes forever to build it up again. My OS told me “per week on crutches the body will need six weeks to rebuild the lost muscle mass”. So in my situation I am looking at 120 weeks. This will keep me occupied for over two years and I am working hard at PT.

~~~

Things one has to work on is getting your range of motion (ROM) back, get rid of the limp when walking and find your proper gait again; one must work on balance, the leg (and knee) is very weak because of missing muscle mass and needs to regain strength. With strength will come endurance as well and of course one has major muscle imbalance to deal with.

Not only the front to the back in the op leg but also from the good leg to the op side leg. While the op hip is still healing, my good hip has to take over and do overtime and being an operated hip itself, there will be the point when even that hip has had it and needs extra love.

 

One must also not forget that some muscles need more attention than others. The glutes for example, so important for basically everything but mine don’t fire properly which throws off everything. The muscles have to be “trained” again to fire  when needed. Another task that takes months.

I am not even getting started about soft tissue issues with scar tissue & adhesion build ups and issues with the pesky hip flexor which by itself can make life miserable already. (Soft tissue issues are very real and can take years to go away).

 

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And since everything is off balance and not working properly, SI dysfunction is never far away either.

 

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The bone will take up to a year to completely heal and till  ALL  of this has settled, calmed down, is strong enough again and balanced, it will be a while. I am not too concerned about the timeline. It will take what it will take.

I could go on and on with this, but my point is, this is a very complex and intense recovery. I am not dragging it on because it’s “oh so much fun”.

I am following instructions from my orthopedic surgeon and my physical therapist and between them and me; time, dedication and  A  LOT  of hard work I am getting it done. Maybe not tomorrow or the day after tomorrow but I know there is a light at the end of the tunnel.

 

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